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    Zimbabwe: 2016 On the Spoor of the Spiral-horned Kudu By Simon K Barr If I were going to take a shot at the kudu we’d been tracking...

    Is Southern Africa the New Argentina?

    Is Southern Africa the New Argentina? By Ken Bailey For years, dedicated dove and pigeon hunters seeking high-volume shooting opportunities have descended annually en masse to...

    Hello, Friends,

    Part of the TGA’s vision is to create a society that is properly informed about the principles and practices of wildlife management and our purpose in investigating the Captive Breeding of Lions Industry (CBL) was to further that purpose. “Something” recently exploded the much respected Professional Hunting Association of South Africa (PHASA) and caused some of its members to form a splinter group which has called itself “The Custodians of Professional Hunting and Conservation – South Africa” (CPHC-SA); but I was unable to discover just what that “something” was. When it happened, all I could ascertain was that it had something to do with the existence of the Captive Breeding of Lions Industry (CBL) about which I knew absolutely nothing.
    Read more here.

    PREAMBLE
    I spent the first half of my adult life (31 years) working within African government National Parks and Wildlife Management agencies. Over the remaining 28 years, I have written 15 wildlife books including five conservation textbooks – two of which are still being used in South Africa’s tertiary education institutions. I am also an investigative wildlife journalist. During my career as a government game warden, I hunted and/or captured large numbers of Africa’s BIG-SEVEN game animals on government duty; including many stock-killing lions. I have also killed 6 man-eating lions. You might say, therefore, that my whole life has been steeped in Africa’s wildlife management affairs.

    NB: The True Green Alliance (TGA) – of which I am the CEO – has no affiliation with SAPA (the South African Predator Association) which controls the activities of the CBL Industry. This article, therefore, is an independent report measured only against my personal experience
    Read more here.

    My interest in the CBL was sparked by the cataclysmic eruption that blew the South African Professional Hunting Industry apart – a process that started some two years ago; and that occurred, seemingly, because of the very existence of the CBL industry. A splinter group of the longstanding and much respected Professional Hunters Association of South Africa (PHASA) formed its own association which it called The Custodians of Professional Hunting and Conservation – South Africa (CPHC-SA). The Custodians immediately claimed the high ground stating that CPHC-SA was the only professional hunting association in South Africa that practices ‘ethical hunting’ – a stance which I could not, at the time, understand.
    Read more here.