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    Tracking Butterflies!

    By Joe Greco The Fall 2019 issue of AHG was the first issue I received after becoming a lifetime member. It didn’t take long to...

    African trackers – the last of a vanishing breed

    By Kyle Ball M.D. Robin Hurt. Coenrard Vermaack. Gary Kelly. Gordon Mace. Paul Ferreira. Carl Stormanns - professional hunters all, and well-known operators in their...

    The Formation of the Conservation Coalition-Botswana

    By Zig Mackintosh Our latest 60-minute documentary, Voices from the Frontline: Communities and Livelihoods in Botswana, follows Jack Ramsden, a young cattle rancher from Maun,...

    Volker Grellmann of Namibia: Giant of a Gentleman, Giant of a Hunter

    By Brooke ChilversLubin When I first started attending the SCI Convention in Las Vegas the 1980s, we all lived and exhibited together under the same...

    The Safari… Experience It

    There is a certain magic this continent offers the visiting hunter. Our challenge is to understand exactly what that is, package it, and spread...

    A THOUSAND DAYS

    By Jeffery Belongia   I love waking up on safari. Of course, there’s no place like Africa, and even after 52 hunts in seven countries, I...

    The Charge of the White Brigade!

    South Africa: 2016 By Darrell Sterling Irwin Tam and his sons Stephen and Peter are avid conservationists and lifetime members of SCI, raising and donating tens...

    Mozambican Monster

    Mozambique: 2017   By Darby Wright                   “We must go into the jesse and search for our buffalo," said our PH Ian Rutledge.   If you've never been to Mozambique,...

    Many Hunts and a Mercy Mission

     By Kim Stuart Zimbabwe:  1996 - 2018   It was 1996 when I was with hunting buddy Jim Gefroh. Being novices, we had booked our first tuskless...

    Hello, Friends,

    Part of the TGA’s vision is to create a society that is properly informed about the principles and practices of wildlife management and our purpose in investigating the Captive Breeding of Lions Industry (CBL) was to further that purpose. “Something” recently exploded the much respected Professional Hunting Association of South Africa (PHASA) and caused some of its members to form a splinter group which has called itself “The Custodians of Professional Hunting and Conservation – South Africa” (CPHC-SA); but I was unable to discover just what that “something” was. When it happened, all I could ascertain was that it had something to do with the existence of the Captive Breeding of Lions Industry (CBL) about which I knew absolutely nothing.
    Read more here.

    PREAMBLE
    I spent the first half of my adult life (31 years) working within African government National Parks and Wildlife Management agencies. Over the remaining 28 years, I have written 15 wildlife books including five conservation textbooks – two of which are still being used in South Africa’s tertiary education institutions. I am also an investigative wildlife journalist. During my career as a government game warden, I hunted and/or captured large numbers of Africa’s BIG-SEVEN game animals on government duty; including many stock-killing lions. I have also killed 6 man-eating lions. You might say, therefore, that my whole life has been steeped in Africa’s wildlife management affairs.

    NB: The True Green Alliance (TGA) – of which I am the CEO – has no affiliation with SAPA (the South African Predator Association) which controls the activities of the CBL Industry. This article, therefore, is an independent report measured only against my personal experience
    Read more here.

    My interest in the CBL was sparked by the cataclysmic eruption that blew the South African Professional Hunting Industry apart – a process that started some two years ago; and that occurred, seemingly, because of the very existence of the CBL industry. A splinter group of the longstanding and much respected Professional Hunters Association of South Africa (PHASA) formed its own association which it called The Custodians of Professional Hunting and Conservation – South Africa (CPHC-SA). The Custodians immediately claimed the high ground stating that CPHC-SA was the only professional hunting association in South Africa that practices ‘ethical hunting’ – a stance which I could not, at the time, understand.
    Read more here.